A Traditional Tool Chest in Two Days with Christopher Schwarz Video Download

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Norris Planes


   
 

Making and Using Tools - Planes, Scrapers, and Shaves


 
  Building an English Steel Miter Plane – Part II by Adrian Britt 7 of 13  

It is now time for me to focus on the infill. I have found after building several infill planes that it is best to make the infill when the plane can still be disassembled. Before peening, the infill can be reviewed and test fitted from 360-degrees. After final assembly, and for the fit to be perfect, the infill has to be slowly let or “smoked” into the corresponding body pocket.

The first step is to work on the rear infill and bed. I use the body as a template to trace the radius and length. I cut the radius first using a backsaw to hack off the large waste. Then, I move to the coarse wood rasp to finish the rough profile. To complete the rough shape, a fine modeler’s rasp works best for me.

To smoke the fit of the infill, I use a #2 pencil to mark the inside steel of the body. Once the infill is inserted, I tap it lightly with a hammer to transfer the marks created by any high spots. I repeat this step until the infill fits precisely.

Once the rear infill is “smoked” in, I mark and cut the bed at the proper angle.
I measure and check that it lines up with the sole plate and is perfectly level and square on all axis.

The faint black smudges are from the #2 pencil lead. These high spots are interfering with the infill fitting precisely. After the bed angle is cut, I make any adjustments to the fit of the infill. This procedure is a great job for the modeler’s rasp.

I have a good fit with just enough proud timber. I will adjust the height
flush with the plane body after peening.

After I square up a suitable piece of timber for the wedge, I transfer my wedge layout to the timber being sure that the wedge blank is too wide. When I make the wedge fit later, I can trim it to fit.


 
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